Saturday, March 24, 2018 • 10:00am – 3:00pm

Learn about dinosaurs straight from the experts!

Lecture in the Aykroyd Family Theatre

Join us for an information-filled forum of fossil facts, with back-to-back mini-lectures from six dinosaur experts we have the honour of hosting, including Drs. Eva Koppelhus and Philip Currie! The symposium will be separated into two sessions with distinct themes. Dr. Koppelhus kicks off the fantastic morning theme of Women in Palaeo, followed by an exciting afternoon on the Great Canadian Dino Rush, with Dr. Currie as keynote.

Event access is $30 per person, and includes all six lectures plus a delicious lunch in our restaurant!

Dinosaur enthusiasts of all interest levels won’t want to miss this chance to learn directly from the experts!

Itinerary

• 9:30am – Refreshments
Morning Session: Women in Palaeo
• 10:00am – Welcome & Introductory Remarks
• 10:10am – Keynote – Dr. Eva Koppelhus – Women in Palaeontology in Alberta
• 10:50am – Break & Refreshments
• 11:05am – Robin Sissons – Fun and Fossils, Fieldwork in Northern Alberta
• 11:25am – Wendy Sloboda – It’s a Wendyceratops Kinda Thing
• 11:45am – Break for Lunch
Afternoon Session: The Great Canadian Dino Rush
• 12:45pm – Afternoon Session Opening Remarks
• 1:00pm – Dr. David Evans – Levi Sternberg, the ROM, and the Canadian Dinosaur Rush
• 1:20pm – Dr. Jordan Mallon – “In Which Her Buried Treasure Dwells”: Ottawa’s role in the Great Canadian Dinosaur Rush
• 1:45am – Break
• 2:00pm – Keynote – Dr. Philip Currie – Asleep But Not Dead: The rise, fall, and resurrection of the Great Canadian Dinosaur Rush
• 2:45pm – Closing Remarks & Thanks
• 3:00pm – Refreshments


Speakers & Topics

Dr. Eva Koppelhus

DR. EVA KOPPELHUS

University of Alberta

Women in Palaeontology in Alberta

Saturday, March 24 • 10:10am • Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum, Aykroyd Family Theatre

During the last 100 years women have slowly made their way into palaeonotology, which has traditionally been a male-dominated science. This talk will highlight some of the fantastic women that the West has been able to inspire because of the amazing fossil record. These women showed an incredible amount of endurance and love for science. The difficulties they had to put up with to succeed is today difficult to comprehend, but they opened the way for younger generations of women to continue in their footsteps. Now girls are encouraged at a young age to go into science and love it.

Robin Sissons

ROBIN SISSONS

University of Alberta

Fun and Fossils, Fieldwork in Northern Alberta

Saturday, March 24 • 11:05am • Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum, Aykroyd Family Theatre

Fossils in Northern Alberta are slowly getting more recognition, catching up with their prestigious neighbors to the south as more research is conducted and published. Dedicated and systematic prospecting in the area has begun to yield some exciting results. Learn about some of the fun and fossils coming out of the Boreal Alberta Dinosaur Project, an international group of palaeontologists and geologists working with local help from the Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum and the Grande Prairie Regional College. Get a sneak peek into some of the exciting fossils being prepared at the University of Alberta from several years of fieldwork in the Peace Region.

Wendy Sloboda

WENDY SLOBODA

Southern Alberta Dinosaur Project

It’s a Wendyceratops Kinda Thing

Saturday, March 24 • 11:25am • Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum, Aykroyd Family Theatre

This talk will feature Sloboda’s field work with the Southern Alberta Dinosaur Project in partnership with Dr. Michael Ryan of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History and Dr. David Evans of the Royal Ontario Museum. It will focus on some of the cool finds she has made in southern Alberta, as well as the day she found Wendiceratops and all of the steps that led up to the naming of the new species.

Dr. David Evans

DR. DAVID EVANS

Royal Ontario Museum/University of Toronto

Levi Sternberg, the ROM, and the Canadian Dinosaur Rush

Saturday, March 24 • 1:00pm • Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum, Aykroyd Family Theatre

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Royal Ontario Museum’s dinosaur collection program in Alberta. Led by Levi Sternberg, the ROM engaged in sustained fossil collecting in the badlands of the Red Deer River Valley and beyond for the next 50 years. During this time, ROM teams made historic discoveries, including the famous tube-crested duck-billed dinosaur Parasaurolophus walkeri in 1921. Today, the ROM continues its field research here as the Southern Alberta Dinosaur Project, and continues to make significant Canadian dinosaur discoveries.

Dr. Jordan Mallon

DR. JORDAN MALLON

Canadian Museum of Nature

“In Which Her Buried Treasure Dwells”

Ottawa’s role in the Great Canadian Dinosaur Rush

Saturday, March 24 • 1:20pm • Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum, Aykroyd Family Theatre

At the front-and-centre of the Great Canadian Dinosaur Rush was the Canadian Museum of Nature, then a part of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). It was the GSC that uncovered most of Canada’s first dinosaur fossils during the 1880s, and that sponsored the Sternberg family of fossil hunters to amass one of the world’s best collections of dinosaurs between 1912 and 1915. These fossils can still be seen on display at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa today. This talk will showcase those early expeditions of the GSC, including some of their most significant finds. Exciting discoveries continue to be made through ongoing preparation of those early collections.

Dr. Philip Currie

DR. PHILIP CURRIE

University of Alberta

Asleep But Not Dead

The rise, fall, and resurrection of the Great Canadian Dinosaur Rush

Saturday, March 24 • 2:00pm • Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum, Aykroyd Family Theatre

The Great Canadian Dinosaur Rush faltered after the 1920s, a victim of two world wars and the Great Depression. Sporadic fieldwork by the National Museum of Canada and the Royal Ontario Museum continued to work in Alberta at a reduced rate. The turning point was the Vertebrate Palaeontology Conference at the University of Alberta in 1963, and within two years serious collecting programs had been set up at the Provincial Museum of Alberta and at the University of Alberta. It was another decade before the turnaround took affect, however. With the designation of Dinosaur Provincial Park as a World Heritage Site in 1979, the stage was now set for the creation of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, and a level of collecting activity and research equivalent to the original Dinosaur Rush.


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